Tax Relief and Exemptions

Real Property and Personal Property Exemptions and Exclusions

  • Builder Property Tax Exemption

    For Residential Property: Excludes from taxation the increase in property value attributable to:

    • Subdivision of a parcel for future residential construction.
    • Non-structural improvements (grading, streets, utilities, etc.) for future residential construction.
    • Construction of a new single-family home or duplex.

    The property must continue to be owned by a builder, not occupied by a tenant, and not used as a model home or for any other commercial purposes. The exclusion is limited to three years from the date the property was first subject to be listed by the builder. 

    For Commercial Property: Commercial property may benefit from the new exclusion for a maximum of five years, but the exclusion covers only the increase in value attributable to subdivision or non-structural improvements. Any improvement requiring a building permit terminates exclusion eligibility.

  • Circuit Breaker Tax Relief

    North Carolina defers a portion of the property taxes of a permanent residence owned and occupied by a North Carolina resident who has owned and occupied the property at least five years, is at least 65 years of age OR is totally and permanently disabled, and whose income does not exceed $50,700.

    If the owner’s income is $33,800 or less, then the portion of property taxes imposed on the residence that exceeds 4% of the owner’s income may be deferred.

    If the owner’s income is more than $33,800 but less than or equal to $50,700, then the portion of the property taxes on the residence that exceeds 5% of the owner’s income may be deferred. 

    For applicants under 65, a Form AV-9A Disability Certification must completed by a medical professional.

  • Historic Property Deferral

    All historical applications are to be filed between January 1st and January 31st of any given year as specified under North Carolina General Statutes. To qualify you must submit a deferment application to the Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission (HLC). 

    Once your application has been processed, a HLC representative will schedule a site visit to review the property and determine if it qualifies for historical designation. Elements qualifying for historical designation will be eligible for city and county tax deferment of 50% of the taxable assessed value. 

    If a property loses its historical designation, taxes shall be computed as if the property had not been classified for that year, and taxes for the preceding three deferred fiscal years shall be payable immediately with interest as indicated in G.S. 105-360 for unpaid taxes. 

  • Tractor on a farm
    Present-Use Value Assessment (Agriculture, Horticulture and Forestry)

    As a commercial producer of agricultural, horticultural or forest products, North Carolina allows eligible producers to apply for tax assessment on the basis of present use, rather than full market value. Application due Jan 31. Per N.C.G.S  105-277.4.

    View the program guide for additional information.

  • Property Tax Exclusion for the Elderly

    North Carolina excludes from property taxes a portion of the appraised value of a permanent residence owned and occupied by North Carolina residents who are at least 65 years of age and whose income does not exceed $33,800. 

    The amount of the appraised value of the residence that may be excluded from taxation is the greater of $25,000 or 50% of the appraised value of the residence. Income means all monies received from every source other than gifts or inheritances received from a spouse, lineal ancestor, or lineal descendant.

  • Tax Exemption or Exclusion

    You may be entitled to a tax exemption or exclusion if your real, business and individual personal property meets the criteria outlined in Form AV.10.

Exemptions and Exclusions for Individuals with Disabilities

  • Disabled man in wheelchair drive a car
    Disabled Veteran Exemption for Speciality Motor Vehicles

    A motor vehicle owned by a disabled veteran that is altered with special equipment to accommodate a service-connected disability. As used in this section, disabled veteran means a person as defined in 38 U.S.C. 101 (2) who is entitled to special automotive equipment for a service connected disability, as provided in 38 U.S.C. 3901.

  • Disabled Veteran Property Tax Relief

    The disabled veteran homestead exemption is the first $45,000 of your assessed real property value. Co-owners who are not spouses and who are individually eligible for the benefit will receive the total exemption of $90,000.

    To Qualify: The property owner must be a veteran of any branch of the US Armed Forces with an honorable discharge and one of the following criteria:

    • The property owner must have a permanent & total service connected disability of 100%.
    • Rated Permanently Individually Unemployable by the US Department of Veteran Affairs. 
    • The property owner must be in receipt of Dependents Indemnity Compensation (Survivors Pension) as a surviving spouse.
  • Property Tax Exclusion for Permanently Disabled

    North Carolina excludes from property taxes a portion of the appraised value of a permanent residence owned and occupied by North Carolina residents who are certified as totally and permanently disabled, and whose income does not exceed $33,800.

    The amount of the appraised value of the residence that may be excluded from taxation is the greater of $25,000 or 50% of the appraised value of the residence. Income means all monies received from every source other than gifts or inheritances received from a spouse, lineal ancestor, or lineal descendant.

    For applicants under 65, a Form AV-9A Disability Certification must completed by a medical professional.

Vehicle Exemptions and Exclusions

  • Antique Automobile Exclusion

    An "antique automobile" must meets all of the following conditions:

    • It is registered with the DMV and has an historic vehicle special license plate.
    • It is maintained primarily for use in exhibitions, club activities, parades, and other public interest functions.
    • It is used only occasionally for other purposes.
    • It is owned by an individual.
    • It is used by the owner for a purpose other than the production of income and is not used in connection with a business.

    An antique automobile must be assessed at the lower of its true value or five hundred dollars ($500.00).

  • City Auto Fee Elderly Reduction

    For residents who live within the city limits of Charlotte, who are 65 years of age or older in the month in which the automobile registration expires, and whose disposable income does not exceed $31,000.

    Disposable income includes, but is not limited to, all monies received from Social Security, retirement funds, and dividends for the prior year, per Charlotte City Ordinance 13-47 and North Carolina General Statute §105-134.5.

    For more information on this exemption, contact the Office of the Tax Collector.